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Author Topic: Growing roses from cuttings
<Cristi>
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posted March 02, 2003 11:29 PM           Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been reading about starting Roses from cuttings. I was wondering if you could do this from the roses you get from a florist. Seems like an inexpencive way to start a variety of rose bushes. Buy a single stem rose from a florist and come home and start it growning. Any reason this wouldn't work? Do they treat them with something that would prevent rooting it? Any insight would be greatly appriciated!! Thanks!

Cristi


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<wilf>
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posted March 12, 2003 08:45 PM           Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As far as I understand it, florist roses are generally not good candidates for rooting. They are usually not very hardy plants and most need to be grown in a green house. The antique or old shrub roses would be much better for rooting, since most of them grow on their own roots any ways.
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<noName>
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posted October 07, 2003 01:20 AM           Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think it's hard for the plant to go from cut flowered state back to a vegetative state, but what do I know. Think I'll give this one a try. If you have any input, please reply. Think I'll take the cutting and dip it in a cloning gel, then try to get it to root in an warmed aeroponic system. Not about to use rockwool...yek
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<meri>
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posted November 01, 2003 12:13 PM           Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was reading the replies about florist roses and using them as a cutting to propogate roses. I am currently experimenting with three roses from a florist ( the flower hold a symbolic meaning for me) and actually, I left the bloom on, covere two red roses with an inverted soda plastic bottle, and a white rose with an inverted perserving jar. That was on Sept. 17, the two rose blooms are just now deteriorating, however, the white rose is still in a perserved state as it was on September 17, 2003. It is now November 1 and I am wondering if anyone can explain why this white rose has survived in this state for almost 7 weeks. I am truly an amateur but even I know there's something special going on. I live in and are 5-6 and with winter coming I wouln't be suprised if I get to call this rose the Frozen Rose.
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<Monica>
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posted November 28, 2003 01:07 PM           Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is really interesting about the white rose. Please let us know what happens and if it does start to root. You may be on to something!
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